Friday Morning Music Shuffle – PB&J Mix

It’s Friday – smile!
Um or um – not sure what to say.  I’ve found some words, and will be writing about the In-Store performance I saw yesterday…so stay tuned.
Today we have a quirkily awesome mix of music so let’s get to it…
First up we have transplanted Nashvillian Eef Barzelay’s band Clem Snide post-reunion effort The Ghost of Fashion (2010) and a track called Joan Jett of Arc which name drops Hall and Oates, John Mellencamp’s Pink Houses  and others to great effect and humor. 
   
Next we have a track from the solo debut album, Resolutions by Dave Hause who has been a member of several Philadelphia-based bands over the years. We have the excellent lead track of the album, Time Will Tell is a raw and starkly, beautiful song.
 
 Next up we have a cover, and it’s a good one.  Mitch Easter the producer was responsible for tons of my favorite music way back in my youth – R.E.M., his own band Let’s Active, yesterday’s Connells album we featured, Marshall Crenshaw, Pylon, Suzanne Vega, Game Theory … deep breath. Here we have Mitch Easter the performer from the fairly recent Velvet Underground tribute CD American Velvet.  His cover of The Black Angel’s Death Song  which was on the Velvet’s first album The Velvet Underground and Nico.  Easter’s gentle Carolina twang adds a note of Southern Gothic charm to the dark and dissonant song. 
 
Lou Reed John Cale and Nico Reuniting in 1972

(Couldn’t find a video of Mitch Easter’s version – so here’s Beck’s cover)

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Eef Barzelay

Eef Barzelay
Eef Barzelay


The Velvet Underground and Nico The Velvet Underground and Nico
The Velvet Underground and Nico has influenced the sound of more bands than any other album. And remarkably, it still sounds as fresh and challenging today as it did upon its release in 1967. In this book, Joe Harvard covers everything from Lou Reed’s lyrical genius to John Cale’s groundbreaking instrumentation, and from the creative input of Andy Warhol to the fine details of the recording process. With input from co-producer Norman Dolph and Velvets fan Jonathan Richman, Harvard documents the creation of a record which – in the eyes of many – has never been matched. EXCERPTIn 1966, some studios, like Abbey Road, had technicians in white lab coats, and even the less formal studios usually had actual engineering graduates behind the consoles. Studios were still more about science than art. Clients who dared make technical suggestions were treated with bemusement, derision, or hostility. The Velvets were a young band under constant critical attack, and the pressure to conform in order to gain acceptance must have been tremendous. Most bands of that era compromised with their record companies, through wholesale revamping of their image from wardrobe to musical style, changing or omitting lyrics, creating drastically edited versions for radio airplay, or eliminating songs entirely from their sets and records. With Andy Warhol in the band’s corner, such threats were minimized.


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