Thursday Morning Music Shuffle – Carburetor Mix

Why Carburetor? Why not?
So, the Black Keys played a secret show in Nashville and from I can tell people were racing around all over  town to try see them. With my luck, I probably would have ended up at an Are You Randy show.*  
*Obligatory Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist reference.
To the shuffle:
First up – It’s Jelly Roll Morton’s Red Hot Peppers doing Black Bottom Stomp  – from 1926.

 
Next, we have Nashville’s own Darrell Scott from his 2008 release Modern Hymns with a Paul Simon cover: American Tune .
 
We seem to be all about The Joy of Painting this week, as we dig deeper into their Asterisk album with the song, My Personality
 
Finally, we have our second cover to the morning, this time it’s Delta Spirit covering Tom Wait’s for a Daytrotter Session. Come on Up to the House is from Wait’s 1999 album Mule Variations.

 Delta Spirit’s Cover

 The Wait’s original

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Affiliated Links
The Best of Jelly Roll Morton: Piano Solo The Best of Jelly Roll Morton: Piano Solo
20 pieces from this popular jazz composer, including titles featured in the Tony Award-winning musical Jelly’s Last Jam. Includes: Billy Goat Stomp * Jelly Roll Blues * London Blues * Queen of Spades * Shreveport Stomp * and more.


Tom Waits on Tom Waits: Interviews and Encounters Tom Waits on Tom Waits: Interviews and Encounters
This autobiographical portrait of Tom Waits takes shape through a selection of more than 50 interviews. Starting with the first interview–on KPFK-FM’s “Folkscene” in 1973–Waits speaks out on a variety of topics and shares something truly unique with his readers. In a rap that is a synthesis of inflections–Louis Armstrong, Charles Bukowski, Jack Kerouac, Mark Twain, hobo, pool hall attendant, vaudevillian huckster, musicologist par excellence, and a fresh slathering of the organic word-ooze of William S. Burroughs–Waits comes across as well read, informed, and lucidly aware of current pop culture. He delivers prose as crafted, poetic, potent, brilliant, and haunting as the lyrics of his best songs.


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